University of Malaya (Goat)

Prof. Dr. Ramli bin Abdullah, Ph.D.
Laboratory Director, NaTuRe Laboratory,
Institute of Postgraduate Studies,
University of Malaya, Malaysia
www.um.edu.my

Helping Local Goat Farmers Succeed

Professor Ramli bin Adbullah, of the University of Malaya, began using the IVOS for goat reproduction research more than ten years ago. His previous and current studies mainly focus on goat artificial insemination and ICSI of goat oocytes with cryopreserved sperm.

Professor bin Abdullah says that the "IVOS enables us to perform fast and accurate assessment of pre-freeze and post-thaw sperm motility, viability, and morphology in goat sperm. This capability is critical to my research in the area of sperm physiology, which has important applications in animal and livestock production in Malaysia, especially in goats. The IVOS has helped us tremendously in our research into goat reproductive technology, so much so that we are able to commercialize our cryopreserved semen."

When asked what he likes best about the IVOS, Professor bin Abdullah says, "the IVOS cuts the analysis time for each sample by at least half while delivering a reliable and accurate result." Before using the IVOS, everything was done manually and was very time-consuming.

The HDATA ASCII option has been particularly useful in Prof. bin Abdullah's research because, "with the HDATA ASCII one can export the data on the IVOS to any other computer to be stored together with the other databases." The information can then be analyzed in any number of ways.

Professor bin Abdullah thinks Hamilton Thorne's customer service is exceptional; "Hamilton Thorne not only installed IVOS for us but also provided training and excellent customer support service so that we are able to run the machine almost immediately. If ever there are any questions, the people at Hamilton Thorne are just a phone call away and they usually solve the problem within the same day."

Professor bin Abdullah has been instrumental in the development of the Jermasia goat breed, a cross between the indigenous Malaysian Katjang breed and the German Fawn goat (shown above). Because the Jermasia are better suited for the tropics than other breeds and produce a significantly higher volume of milk than indigenous goats, Professor bin Abdullah's work with the breed has been critical to the success of local farmers.

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